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Current Replies for Toe rail dams water
 
  Toe rail dams water (Tonyj)
Posted: 11:10:23 am on 1/6/2013 Modified: Never
 
Hi:
My MkV often has a rain puddle at the toe rail, which acts like a dam.
Are there any fixes out there for this problem?  Do I need to cut slots in the toe rails?
Tony Jeske
MkV #581
FLYING CIRCUS
San Diego  
  Re: Toe rail dams water (ALAN FORD)
Posted: 1:32:51 pm on 1/6/2013 Modified: 4:33:26 pm on 1/6/2013
 
Tony, I have a similar situation but it is restricted to the last 3 feet or so on each side aft. The toe rail already has about 70 slots each side, the bottoms of which are a little above the deck. In my case the very shallow puddles gather in the gutter (that is probably a very un-nautical term) and can no longer drain over the transom due to the boat's sheer being horizontal at that point, and there are some pushpit mounting fittings in that area to add to the dam effect.
My solution is a sponge!!!
Happy New Year in your sunny part of the world.

Alan of SMOKE 1984 Mk V 002



I think I should have used "scupper" instead of "gutter",????
  Re: Toe rail dams water (davidww1)
Posted: 4:32:56 pm on 1/6/2013 Modified: Never
 
There was a Mk II at our club with the base on the toe rail cut through to allow water to drain. It struck me as an over-reaction to a minor aesthetic problem, given the undoubted significant contribution made by that rail to the boat's strength.

There was a period in the 80's when _everyone_ was fitting cute little drains along the toerail to deal with this "problem". It seems to have stopped when people realized they were adding several hundred dollars in cost plus two more through-hulls below the waterline to solve a problem that can be solved with a 25-cent sponge.


David Weatherston
Towser, Toronto
C&C 27 Mk IV

  Re: Toe rail dams water (diva27)
Posted: 10:01:06 am on 1/19/2013 Modified: Never
 
Any boat with a curvy sheer has this problem of a low spot somewhere aft of midships. I seem to recall some clever person draping a small towel over a lifeline with one end in the puddling area. The cloth acted as a wick and sopped up the water as it gathered.
My Mk 1 has this exciting pooling feature. I've never done anything about it.

Doug Hunter
Diva
C&C 27 Mk1
Midland Bay Sailing Club
www.douglashunter.ca

  Re: Toe rail dams water (ALAN FORD)
Posted: 12:15:29 pm on 1/20/2013 Modified: Never
 
If Doug's towel were first wrapped around a warm  beer, then clipped to the lifeline, I suspect you'd quickly have a cool beer.  Tony in California, hang on to your puddles......

Alan of SMOKE 1984 Mk V 002

  Re: Toe rail dams water (admin)
Posted: 3:38:39 pm on 1/20/2013 Modified: Never
 
> I think I should have used "scupper" instead of "gutter"?

According to The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea, which I was moved to read by the question on good books, a scupper is a hole in the bulwarks or hull itself. What you describe with the scandalously lubberly term "gutter" is a feature I have heard referred to as a "waterway". In this instance it was the four-inch-wide recess naturally formed between the bulwark and a raised overlay of teak planks fastened on top of the steel deck proper.

Since C&C 27's have neither scuppers nor waterways, this entire exercise may better be characterized as a means of filling a cold Sunday afternoon than a useful contribution to knowledge.

- Admin


  Re: Toe rail dams water (ALAN FORD)
Posted: 7:53:51 pm on 1/20/2013 Modified: Never
 
So Towser's elegant description of a "cute little drain" is really no more than a C&C's "scupper"?  It must be a very dull day, for even the volcanoes are at rest.  

Alan of SMOKE 1984 Mk V 002

  Re: Toe rail dams water (davidww1)
Posted: 10:16:10 pm on 1/20/2013 Modified: Never
 
A very dull day - last day of the Toronto Boat Show, the day that everyone describes as the "divorced dads looking for something to do with the kids on custody day", and worse, what one boat salesman described to me earlier in the week as "63 days to sailing season". I hope he uses a calculator to price boats, because by my reckoning, it's a good three months - 90-odd days. A long, grim haul of salt, slush and bottom-sanding and naught but wine and whisky to sustain us. Bear up, Alan.


David Weatherston
Towser, Toronto
C&C 27 Mk IV